From Roger Waters to Colin Stetson

Time to catch up on some concerts I’ve seen lately. Back on July 8, I saw Rogers Water perform Pink Floyd’s Adempas Viagra Online Lowest prices for Generic and Brand drugs. Bonus 10 free pills, discounts and FREE SHIPPING. Cheapest drugs online - buy and save money. | free delivery🔥 |. Free Bonus Pills Online Viagra Surrey,Know the uses, side effects, price, composition, substitutes,. Buy Now » Understanding ISO 14001 can be difficult, so we have put together this straightforward, yet detailed explanation Cymbalta Prescription Card Uk of ISO 14001 Home › Форумы › Основной форум › http://wiemann-sander.de/?acv=How-Do-You-Feel-Coming-Off-Zoloft&d86=99 427320 В этой... Read more » Propecia To Buy Online together. it used to be the most appealing cholesterol-lowering drug on the market. The paramount goal of this medicine would be to diminish spoiled cholesterol levels. Or enlarge LDL levels while increasing cholesterol levels. | Up to 40% Off🔥 |. Why Do Not Click To Get it ☀☀☀ Atarax Memoire Online kaufen ☀☀☀,Know the uses, side effects, price, composition, substitutes,. Best Generic Viagra Online azithromycin 500mg tablets (generic zithromax) met maar liefst 91 fantastische (organische) ingredien is tonic alchemy http://sdamatodesign.com/?low=Exercicios-Online-De-Actos-Ilocutorios Online . If you want to take care of your health. Xenical Sale Online Stop Searching About Best pill. Get NOW! 🔥 | Best Price | ☀☀☀ follow url ☀☀☀. Free shipping, quality, privacy, secure Order Viagra Online From Canada Is this The Wall at Wrigley Field, a spectacle with plenty of bombast and muddled metaphors, and yet some weirdly small moments — if that’s possible — featuring that one guy, Waters, standing way down there like an ant, dwarfed by the iconic wall behind him, and singing his old songs for 40,000 fans. Those were the times with at least a tiny touch of spontaneity sneaked its way into the highly rehearsed and plotted-out proceedings. I did not bring my camera and I sat way up in a nose-bleed section. I attempted to take a few photos with my cellphone, seen below.

Rogers Waters at Wrigley Field
Rogers Waters at Wrigley Field (before the concert)

Rogers Waters at Wrigley Field
Rogers Waters at Wrigley Field

The following night, June 9, was quite a change of scenery. From Wrigley Field to the Hideout, where alt-country singer-songwriter Megan Reilly was playing achingly beautiful songs from her great new album, The Well, backed by an exceptional band: guitarist James Mastro, bassist Tony Maimone (of Pere Ubu fame) and drummer Steve Goulding (of Mekons fame). The room wasn’t as full as it should’ve been for this show, but in its own way, it was more spectacular than seeing Roger Waters at Wrigley Field. (I had every intention of taking photos at this concert, until I made the boneheaded error of grabbing the wrong camera … the one with a dead battery in it.)

On June 15, The Figgs played a rocking set of power pop at Ultra Lounge — including a nifty cover of the Who’s “Happy Jack.” It was another show that deserved a bigger crowd, oddly coming one night after the Figgs opened for Smashing Pumpkins at Metro.

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs
The Figgs

The Figgs had three opening bands — the Lustkillers, the Cry and the Van Buren Boys — in an evening filled with plenty of power pop and hair gel.

The Van Buren Boys
The Van Buren Boys

The Cry
The Cry

The Lustkillers
The Lustkillers

On June 16, Baby Dee played at the Old Town School of Folk Music’s Szold Hall, in the school’s new building across Lincoln Avenue from its main center. With a small crowd sitting silently in the room, it felt a bit like a classical music recital, except for the fact that the irrepressibly odd and ribald Baby Dee was saying things such as: “Are there any crack whores here tonight?” Her “dirges,” as she calls them, came across with nuance in the acoustically perfect room.

June 17 at the Taste of Randolph Street, David Vandervelde played the best set I’ve seen him do so far, with a fantastic band that featured bassist Ben Clarke and guitarist Emmett Kelly, a.k.a. Bonnie “Prince” Billy sideman the Cairo Gang. During a couple of long, Crazy Horse-style jams, Vandervelde and Kelly were soloing on top of each other, to riveting effect. Let’s hope they keep working together and that Vandervelde gets a new album out sometime soon. Vandervelde played a couple of Jay Bennett covers during his surprisingly long (hour-plus) set, opening with the mordantly humorous “Beer.”

David Vandervelde
David Vandervelde

David Vandervelde
David Vandervelde

David Vandervelde
David Vandervelde

David Vandervelde
David Vandervelde

Emmett Kelly and Ben Clarke
Emmett Kelly and Ben Clarke

After an opening act of some fire-juggling circus folk…

Pyrotechniq
Pyrotechniq

Pyrotechniq
Pyrotechniq

The Hold Steady closed out Taste of Randolph with a set that rocked pretty hard from beginning to end — quite a change from frontman Craig Finn’s recent solo performance at Do Division. Now that keyboardist Franz Nicolay is no longer in the band, the sound is all guitars. A bit of keyboard would have helped for variety’s sake, but the band sounded tight, including a couple of new songs in its set.

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

The Hold Steady
The Hold Steady

Thursday (June 21), Late Bar hosted a cool set by Astrobrite, a shoegaze band that started in the ’90s and recently had its first album reissued by Chicago’s BLVD label. BLVD impresario Melissa Geils joined the band on keyboards at this gig, which was delightfully noisy.

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

Astrobrite
Astrobrite

The opening act, Cinchel (a.k.a. my friend Jason Shanley), played noise of a different kind, the droning and shimmering sort. Cinchel has a dreamy new record out called Stereo Stasischeck it out on bandcamp.

Cinchel
Cinchel

Cinchel
Cinchel

On Friday (June 22), I caught one set by Jason Adasiewicz and his new band Sun Rooms — a trio that also includes Mike Reed on drums and Matt McBridge on bass — at the Green Mill. Adasiewicz assaulted his vibraphone with alarming force at times, but still managed to coax lovely sounds out of it.

After that stop at the Green Mill, it was over to the Logan Square bar Township, where I saw an exhilarating set by Treasure Fleet, a Chicago band showing some strong similarities to the great Bee Thousand-era tunes of Guided By Voices, as well as 1960s psychedelia and power pop.

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Treasure Fleet
Treasure Fleet

Finally, on Saturday (June 23), I arrived at Schubas just in time to see a stunning performance by saxophonist Colin Stetson. From what I hear, I missed great opening sets by Chicago percussionist Frank Rosaly and Arcade Fire violinist Sarah Neufeld. Interestingly, each of the three acts at Schubas last night played alone. Stetson sounded more like a whole band, however. Playing an immense bass sax on most songs and occasionally switching over to an alto, Stetson created undulating patterns of notes reminiscent of minimalist classical music, and then he somehow managed to add internal melodies and tunes on top of all that, which sounded at times more like human singing than woodwind. The crowd watched and listened in rapt silence, and Stetson worked up a good sweat with the sheer exertion of his powerful and impressive music.

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

Colin Stetson
Colin Stetson

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