Big Ears: Photos from Day 1

Photos from Day 1 of the Big Ears Festival in Knoxville, Tennessee, on March 23, 2017.

(See more Big Ears Festival coverage)

Carla Bley with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra

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Emilia Amper

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Matana Roberts

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Anna Meredith

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My Brightest Diamond

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Blonde Redhead

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More Big Ears Festival coverage:

Read my main blog post about Big Ears Festival 2017.

Photos from Day 2 (Maya Beiser, Matmos, Robyn Hitchcock, Gyan Riley, Richard Teitelbaum, Ståle Storløkken and Arve Henriksen, Jóhann Johannsson’s Drone Mass, Meredith Monk, Michael Hurley and Tortoise)

Photos from Day 3 (Lisa Moore, Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble, Xiu Xiu Plays the Music of Twin Peaks, Musica Elettronica Viva, Joan Shelley, Colin Stetson Performs Sorrow, the Magnetic Fields, Henry Grimes, Jem Cohen: Gravity Hill Sound+Image, Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith, Supersilent, Dave Harrington Group’s live improvised score to No Country for Old Men)

Photos from Day 4 (Pauline Oliveros’ “Rock Piece,” Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, Oliver Coates, St. John’s Choral Evensong, Colleen, Henry Threadgill’s Zooid)

Photos of Wilco (plus Jeff Tweedy with Chikamorachi, On Fillmore and Dustan Louque with Nels Cline)

Photos of the Gavin Bryars Ensemble

Photos of Nils Økland

Cropped Out: Day 2

This is my report from Saturday, Sept. 24, the second day of the 2016 Cropped Out music festival in Louisville, Kentucky. To see my report and photos from the first day, click here.

Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan

Bill Callahan’s performance was the highlight of the Cropped Out festival’s second day, Saturday, Sept. 24, in Louisville. After 7 p.m., as the sun was going down, Callahan walked out onto the American Turner Club’s deck next to the Ohio River, where a small crowd had gathered for his performance. I was sitting right in front of the stage when Callahan stepped around me, casually remarking, “Watch out. There’s a piece of cheese.” Looking down, I saw a small chunk of pizza sitting next to me. After that odd little greeting, Callahan gave a breathtakingly beautiful performance — accompanied, as he often is, by the astounding guitarist Matt Kinsey, as well as bassist Jaime Zuverza (who’d played earlier in the day with his own band, Hidden Ritual).

As they played, insects along the rivers buzzed and chirped. Boats passed by on the river. Birds flying in V-shaped formations crossed the sky overheard. Callahan remarked that the temperature was perfect. In this enchanting setting, as dusk fell, Callahan aptly sang a few songs that mentioned rivers. His set list included songs from his superb recent albums Apocalypse and Dream River, as well as covers of Grateful Dead and Carter Family songs, finishing with a few of the tunes that Callahan performed years ago under the moniker Smog. Throughout it all, Callahan sang with his typical poise, quirky sense of timing and wry humor. Kinsey coaxed incredible sounds out of his Gibson SG electric guitar, almost like a second voice duetting with Callahan.

What a transporting and unforgettable hour it was.

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Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan
Matt Kinsey, playing with Bill Callahan
Matt Kinsey, playing with Bill Callahan
Matt Kinsey, playing with Bill Callahan
Matt Kinsey, playing with Bill Callahan
Jaime Zuverza, playing with Bill Callahan
Jaime Zuverza, playing with Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan
Bill Callahan at Constellation
Bill Callahan at Constellation

SET LIST: Riding for the Feeling / Spring / America! / Easy Wind (Grateful Dead cover) / Drover / Rococo Zephyr / Walk that Lonesome Valley (Carter Family cover) / I’m New Here (Smog song) / Say Valley Maker (Smog song) / Let Me See the Colts (Smog song)

(I saw another Callahan concert two days later, the early set on Sept. 26 at Constellation in Chicago. The set list was similar, with just a few differences, and Zuverza wasn’t present. It was another wonderful performance, even if it lacked the idyllic natural environment of Callahan’s Cropped Out show.)

Cropped Out’s second day started off with an odd, jokey set by Vern — more like performance comedy art than rock concert.

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Vern
Vern
Vern
Vern
Vern
Vern

The New Zealand band Opposite Sex followed, with an intriguing performance, showing the energy of punk rock but with a variety of other influences thrown into the mix. (The group’s recent album Hamlet even includes a couple of quieter songs played on piano.)

Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex
Opposite Sex

The next band up, Felchers, hadn’t been scheduled to perform on the Spooky Beach riverside deck, but it was one of only two stages with working electricity in the early afternoon, so that’s where they ended up. This Kentucky played straight-ahead hardcore punk, growl-shouting phrases like, “Oh my, this is unsettling!”

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Felchers
Felchers
Felchers
Felchers

The Louisville band Insect Policy mixed jazzy art-rock improvisation with punk-style vocals. One of the musicians was wearing an Acid Mothers Temple T-shirt, which gave a pretty good indication of Insect Policy’s influences.

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Insect Policy
Insect Policy
Insect Policy
Insect Policy
Insect Policy
Insect Policy

Creeping Pink played dreamy shoegaze rock, with vocals that blended into the guitars. (On Facebook, the Los Angeles band calls its stuff “Tape Glam.”)

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Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Creeping Pink
Ancient Filth
Ancient Filth
Ancient Filth
Ancient Filth
Ancient Filth
Ancient Filth
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas
Laffing Gas

On the Spooky Beach deck, Chicago artist Matchess (aka Whitney Johnson) performed a lovely sonic collage, with recorded sounds blending into her vocals, keyboards and violin.

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Matchess
Matchess
Matchess
Matchess
Matchess
Matchess

As I mentioned above, Bill Callahan bassist Jaime Zuverza also fronted his own band at Cropped Out — Hidden Ritual — playing dark, brooding rock that reminded me of Protomartyr and the Cure.

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Hidden Ritual
Hidden Ritual
Hidden Ritual
Hidden Ritual
Hidden Ritual
Hidden Ritual

One of my favorite bands on Saturday was Bugg, apparently from Bloomington, Indiana. Searching online, I’ve found only scant information about Bugg, other than a demo posted on YouTube. Bugg’s pop-punk was bursting with energy. At moments, the group reminded me of the Replacements, and then the guys really won me over by doing a cover of the classic Guided By Voices tune “Bulldog Skin.”

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Bugg
Bugg
Bugg
Bugg

Power, a trio from Melbourne, Australia, lived up to its name, playing metal-punk riffs with intensity and precision.

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Power
Power
Power
Power
Power

After Bill Callahan’s astonishing set came a complete change of pace: the St. Louis punk band Black Panties, led by a frontman clad in a black outfit, complete with a face-obscuring mask. The crowd inside Turners Tavern went wild, setting the tone for the rest of the evening, which was marked by much moshing. All of the sets during this late portion of Cropped Out’s second day, Pissed Jeans was the most iconoclastic and unpredictable, clearly having a great deal of fun. Saturday night also featured the festival’s only hip-hop, the longtime rapper Kool Keith, who got much of the crowd dancing.

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Black Panties
Black Panties

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Black Panties
Black Panties
Black Panties
Black Panties
Kool Keith
Kool Keith
Home Blitz
Home Blitz
Lumpy and the Dumpers
Lumpy and the Dumpers
Lumpy and the Dumpers
Lumpy and the Dumpers
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans

Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments, a rock band from Columbus, Ohio, that stopped playing back in 2000, was back together at Cropped Out. I recall seeing this group open for Guided By Voices in 1997, and Saturday’s performance evoked that era of indie rock. The band sounded excellent.

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Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments

Cropped Out concluded with a strong performance by the Austin, Texas, post-punk band Spray Paint. A long two days of music came to an end with a jolt of energy.

Spray Paint
Spray Paint
Spray Paint
Spray Paint

Cropped Out: Day 1

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Cropped Out feels like a homemade music festival. The website for the annual event in Louisville, Kentucky, hasn’t been thoroughly updated for a couple of years. Although the site displays pictures of the 2016 festival lineup, if you click on the drop-down menu for “FESTIVAL,” the most recent info listed is from 2014. Ticket sales are handled through some guy’s PayPal account. ($70 for a weekend pass.) Even the description of the venue is a bit sketchy: American Turners Club? What is that exactly? So, don’t think of Cropped Out as being anything like the bigger, more commercial music festivals. This is not Lollapalooza. It’s DIY.

croppedoutposterI wasn’t sure exactly what to expect when I drove to Louisville last week for Cropped Out, but the Sept. 23-24 festival turned out to be a rather delightful experience. The American Turners Club — a German-American organization’s center with a swimming pool, boat club, gymnastics group, etc. — is a compound along the southern shore of the Ohio River. The place had a feel of a VFW hall crossed with a run-down athletic center. Glamorous, it was not, but the location near the river gave it a pastoral charm. However, the men’s room had a horror-movie vibe, with a urinal trough and blinking neon light next to an oddly vacant room containing a chair.) And the Cropped Out organizers decked out the whole venue with garish Halloween inflatable decorations, bedsheets spray-painted with the names of the various stages, and a bunch of comic-book-style drawings. (Like the one next to the bar that showed someone passed out and surrounded by emptied bottles.)

img_9579There were four stages, including one in a covered outdoor space — where a large monster with outstretched arms hung on the ceiling above the bands. Upstairs, the Turners Tavern hosted indoor performances, including several punk shows (by bands like Black Panties and Lumpy and the Dumpers) that quickly turned into wild mosh pits. My favorite spot was “Spooky Beach,” the deck near the Ohio River shore where several artists performed throughout the weekend. It was sunny and hot both days, and this little stage was an idyllic setting for beautiful performances by Bill Callahan, Joan Shelley, Matchess and others.

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The festival ran on schedule, with only a few minor hitches. (Early on Saturday, a transformer blew out, knocking out the power throughout most of the center, but there was enough electricity to run two stages. And within a couple of hours, the utility company crews had everything fixed.) I’d estimate that a few hundred people attended the festival throughout the weekend. It was always pretty easy to walk around, and to get spots close to the stages. There was no security to speak of, and fans were allowed to walk around on just about all sides of the stages.

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I didn’t get press credentials. I’m not even sure if they were offered, or who was handling publicity for the festival. I just bought a ticket, brought my camera, and took pictures as much as I desired, without anyone stopping me. (That’s the way I like it.)

img_9607The closest thing to a corporate sponsor sign was a tombstone on the roof deck, saying that Cropped Out “is survived” by sponsorship from a list local businesses. It was positioned next to an electric organ, which anyone was welcome to play.

The audience looked like the sort of people I see at indie rock and experimental music shows in Chicago, or in other cities where I’ve attended such concerts: Mostly young people, along with a few middle-aged music aficionados (gray-haired folks like myself). A lot of tattoos and long hair. A fair amount of these people seemed to be from Louisville or nearby. As one of the musicians performing at Cropped Out remarked (I’m forgetting exactly who said this), Kentucky is not just bluegrass music.

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Dry Summers
Dry Summers
Dry Summers
Dry Summers
Dry Summers
Dry Summers

Three of the bands I saw early on Friday, Sept. 23, were Louisville locals, and they offered a good sample of some of the underground music being made in the city today. Dry Summers played off-kilter rock songs with a loopy, cheerful vibe. Pleasure Boys thundered and howled its heavy psychedelic music — epic, but with a slightly goofy air about it, reminding me of early Black Mountain. And Cereal Glyphs impressed me with melodic, psychedelic tunes, a little reminiscent of the 1960s Nuggets records. Other strong performances I saw early on Friday included Paper Claw, hailing from Lafayette, Indiana, a band I definitely want to hear more from.

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Pleasure Boys
Pleasure Boys
Paper Claw
Paper Claw
Paper Claw
Paper Claw
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs
Cereal Glyphs

Performing at “Spooky Beach,” Louisville experimental artist Aaron Rosenblum built a sonic landscape using birdcalls, train noises and electronics.

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Aaron Rosenblum
Aaron Rosenblum
Aaron Rosenblum
Aaron Rosenblum

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Beat Awfuls, a band from Lexington, Kentucky, played indie rock with some of the tunefulness of Guided By Voices.

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Beat Awfuls
Beat Awfuls
Beat Awfuls
Beat Awfuls
Beat Awfuls
Beat Awfuls

Giving Up from Garner, Iowa, played strange, intriguing art-punk with lots of spirit and energy.

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Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up
Giving Up

As I expected, Louisville singer-songwriter Joan Shelley’s performance on Friday was a highlight of Cropped Out. Adding to the beauty of her delicate folk songs — which she sang and played guitar, with perfect accompaniment by guitarist Nathan Salsburg — was the setting. Shelley performed on that deck next to the Ohio River, with the sun going down behind her. It was entrancing and exquisite.

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Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley
Joan Shelley
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg
Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg

Here’s my video of the final song from Joan Shelley’s performance, “Not Over By Half”:

Quilt Boy
Quilt Boy

The festival included one jazz performance, by saxophonist Joe McPhee and pedal-steel guitarist Susan Alcorn. (Yes, a pedal-steel guitarist playing jazz, and in a somewhat unorthodox style — it was entrancing.)

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John McPhee
John McPhee
Susan Alcorn
Susan Alcorn
Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Blossoms

After darkness fell on Friday, Fred and Toody Cole — two-thirds of the punk band Dead Moon — performed their old songs at Spooky Beach, with a couple of bright white lights illuminating their faces amid the gloom.

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Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred and Toody Cole (of Dead Moon)
Fred Cole
Fred Cole
Toody Cole
Toody Cole
Toody Cole
Toody Cole

The Dead C, a New Zealand noise-rock band that’s been together since 1986, performed in the evening under the “Phreedom Hall” awning — or two-thirds of the group performed, anyway. Drummer Robbie Yeats wasn’t present, but guitarists Bruce Russell and Michael Morley conjured up a storm of loud, feedback-drenched textures.

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The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
The Dead C
John Bellows
John Bellows

Friday’s final performance was inside Turners Tavern, where a crowd gathered around Bitchin Bajas and Bonnie “Prince” Billy as they performed mesmerizing, dream-like chants from their recent album together, Epic Jammers and Fortunate Little Ditties.

Bonnie "Prince" Billy
Bonnie “Prince” Billy
Bitchin Bajas
Bitchin Bajas
Bonnie "Prince" Billy
Bonnie “Prince” Billy
Bonnie "Prince" Billy
Bonnie “Prince” Billy
Bonnie "Prince" Billy
Bonnie “Prince” Billy
Bonnie "Prince" Billy
Bonnie “Prince” Billy
Bitchin Bajas
Bitchin Bajas
Bonnie "Prince" Billy and Bitchin Bajas
Bonnie “Prince” Billy and Bitchin Bajas

See my blog post and photos from the second day of Cropped Out.

Solid Sound Fest: Review

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Musicians thank their audiences all the time, but Jeff Tweedy did it even more than usual over the weekend at Solid Sound.

Time and again, he kept thanking his fans for allowing Solid Sound to happen. “It’s too nice of you guys to be here, to make this happen,” he said at one point. Of course, the same thing could be said of all festivals and concerts: They wouldn’t happen if nobody showed up. But it’s unusual to hear a rock star acknowledge that debt to his audience as explicitly as Tweedy did. He sounded humbled and maybe overwhelmed by the whole thing.

Tweedy’s band Wilco organizes the Solid Sound Festival every other year at Mass MoCA, aka the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, which has taken over the sprawling grounds of a 19th-century factory complex in North Adams, a town in the state’s northwest corner. That setting is one of the event’s key attractions: The surrounding landscape is bucolic, and the museum’s cleverly repurposed industrial spaces are filled with oversized, ambitious, eccentric and playful art.

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Francesco Clemente's Encampment installation
Francesco Clemente’s Encampment installation
Jena Priebe, The Secret Lives of Books, part of the Bibliothecaphilia exhibit.
Jena Priebe, The Secret Lives of Books, part of the Bibliothecaphilia exhibit.
An artwork in Jim Shaw's exhibit "Entertaining Doubts."
An artwork in Jim Shaw’s exhibit “Entertaining Doubts.”

Even though Wilco’s headquarters are in Chicago, North Adams is a second home of sorts for the band and its extended musical family. Solid Sound — which returned to the museum June 26-28 for its fourth edition — isn’t totally and completely about Wilco. It does feature other musicians of various genres, as well as standup comedy, films and assorted artsy happenings. But it all revolves around Wilco, and it’s designed with Wilco’s fans in mind. Would you really go to Solid Sound if you didn’t like Wilco?

This year’s festival felt even more Wilco-dominated than the previous fest, in 2013, because a couple of major musical acts, Taj Mahal and King Sunny Ade, canceled their appearances. And yet there were many sterling musical moments that had little or nothing to do with Wilco.

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Luluc

Luluc, a duo from Australia by way of Brooklyn, entranced with its luminous songs; singer Zoë Randell’s voice was chillingly lovely as it melded with Steve Hassett’s expressive guitar lines. After their regular set, they showed up in the museum for an unamplified “pop-up” performance, casting a spell over a small group of people sitting on the gallery floor.

Richard Thompson played his set in electric-guitar mode, focusing on songs from his new album, Still, which was recorded by Tweedy at the Wilco Loft. Perhaps he would have played more of his classics if he’d had more than an hour; he did return to the stage with his trio for a short encore: a rocking cover of the Otis Blackwell song “Daddy Rolling Stone.”

NRBQ, an old band that sounds rejuvenated with its new lineup, played the most party-inducing set of the weekend. The group’s longtime keyboardist, Terry Adams, was clearly having a blast, and Scott Ligon ripped through an extended guitar solo that was staggeringly great.

Other highlights of the weekend included Jeff Davis’ traditional folk songs; a slightly more modern take on that genre by Sam Amidon and Bill Frisell; the energetic indie rock of Speedy Ortiz and Parquet Courts, perhaps the only band all weekend that prompted anything that resembled moshing; the eloquent guitar instrumentals of William Tyler; and the placid breeziness of Real Estate — which was too mellow for many audience members, but still rather nice. (For the record, I missed the sets by the Felice Brothers, Mac DeMarco, Charles Lloyd and Cibo Matto because of schedule conflicts, and caught only a bit of Shabazz Palaces.)

The brilliant John Hodgman curated the comedy portion of Solid Sound, including hilarious improvisation by the group Superego. When Jessica Williams of The Daily Show and Phoebe Robinson took the stage, the two African-American comedians said they had a bet over how many black audience members there would be. (Robinson predicted five; Williams, seven). They asked any black people in the crowd to say “Woo!” and counted six. (Yes, it should be noted here that Solid Sound attracts an overwhelmingly white audience, though it is diverse in other ways, covering a wide age range but skewing toward middle-aged folks and families with kids.)

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The weekend was filled with Wilco side projects. The band’s virtuoso guitarist, Nels Cline, showed off his art-school side with a solo set of evocative noises and textures, while the big screen behind him in the Hunter Center displayed a picture being painted and rapidly transformed by artist Norton Wisdom on the other side of the stage. Meanwhile, dancers choreographed by Sarah Elgart writhed inside colored fabric like fetuses desperate to escape the womb. This multimedia experience, called “Stained Radiance,” may sound a bit pretentious on paper, but it was an impressive and affecting spectacle.

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Wilco’s remarkable drummer, Glenn Kotche, performed contemporary chamber music with former Kronos Quartet cellist Jeffrey Zeigler. It culminated with “The Immortal Flux,” a percussion piece composed by Kotche using recordings that evoke the history of the Mass MoCA building. Fifty volunteer percussionists played drums specially created for the occasion. Unfortunately, the muffled acoustics in the back of the big gallery space failed to convey all of the music’s nuances.

The Autumn Defense, the soft-rock band led by Wilco members John Stirratt and Pat Sansone, teamed up with the Australian band The Windy Hills for another unusual set. They played music composed and recorded for Spirit of Akasha, a film that celebrates an earlier surf movie with a cult following, Morning of the Earth. But this wasn’t typical surf rock. The Windy Hills’ songs, which dominated the set, were more like Crosby, Stills & Nash. Even when the Autumn Defense guys joined in for an instrumental jam, it had a hippy groove reminiscent of CSN’s “Long Time Gone.”

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There was an also a museum exhibit showing an interactive Wilco timeline, with fans’ memories on Post-It notes. Elsewhere in the museum, a replica of Wilco’s stage setup gave fans a chance to see what it looks like standing by those guitars, keyboards and drums.

But of course, the main attractions were Wilco itself and Jeff Tweedy. Friday night’s headline concert was an all-acoustic show by Wilco — the first time the band has ever done a show that was unplugged from beginning to end. Some of the songs (including a couple from Tweedy’s days with Uncle Tupelo) were acoustic in the first place, but others sounded radically different in this format, with Cline’s lap steel guitar or trilling acoustic strings replacing electric riffs, as xylophone and melodica filled in for synthesizers and other layers from the full rock arrangements. This show came on the same day as the Supreme Court decision in favor of same-sex marriage, and after Wilco played “Hesitating Beauty,” Tweedy commented: “I was thinking it’s so much nicer singing that song now that everyone can get married.”

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SET LIST: Misunderstood / War on War / I’m Always in Love / Company in My Back / Hummingbird / Bull Black Nova / Handshake Drugs / Hesitating Beauty / She’s a Jar / One Wing / Kamera / New Madrid / Forget the Flowers / It’s Just That Simple / Airline to Heaven / Dawned on Me / I Got You (At the End of the Century) / Passenger Side / Outta Mind (Outta Sight) / Whole Love / Jesus, Etc. / Walken / The Thanks I Get / Theologians / A Shot in the Arm / ENCORE: True Love Will Find You in the End (Daniel Johnston cover) / We’ve Been Had / Casino Queen / Hoodoo Voodoo / I’m a Wheel

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Saturday ended with a more typical Wilco concert, which began an hour early because of a rainstorm predicted for later in the night. As it turned out, the rain started falling before Wilco played the first notes of “I’m the Man Who Loves You,” and it kept falling throughout the show — but it never got bad enough to cut off the music. After all of the quiet strumming and banjo plucking on Friday night, Wilco came out ready to rock on Saturday night. The set was heavy on music from the Yankee Hotel Foxtrot era, including some of Wilco’s best obscurities, and it was as solidly entertaining as any Wilco show I’ve ever seen, the rain notwithstanding.

SET LIST: I’m the Man Who Loves You / Kamera / Candyfloss / I Am Trying to Break Your Heart / Art of Almost / At Least That’s What You Said / Either Way / Pot Kettle Black / Panthers / Sunken Treasure / Secret of the Sea / Heavy Metal Drummer / Born Alone / Laminated Cat (aka Not for the Season) / Ashes of American Flags / Hotel Arizona / Box Full of Letters / Impossible Germany / A Magazine Called Sunset / Via Chicago / ENCORE: Let’s Not Get Carried Away / Dark Neon / The Late Greats / Kingpin / Monday / Outtasite (Outta Mind)

On Sunday afternoon, the festival finished up with a set by Tweedy, the band behind 2014’s Sukierae album, which includes Jeff as well as his son Spencer on drums, plus Jim Elkington on guitar, Darin Gray on bass, Liam Cunningham on keyboards, and Sima Cummingham on harmony vocals. The songs from this record aren’t radically different from the style of Jeff Tweedy’s music with Wilco, but there’s a different dynamic among these players. The band stretched out a few moments with fierce krautrock-style repetition. When someone in the crowd called out, “You’re doing a good job, Jeff,” Tweedy thanked him for the vote of confidence. He said he must have the sort of face that prompts people to feel the need to offer words of encouragement. The sky was gray and a light drizzle fell as the band played. “This is the perfect weather for these songs, I think,” Tweedy remarked.

After an hour by Tweedy the band, Jeff Tweedy played a solo acoustic set. “I’m trying to think of the happiest songs I can play, to get you guys going,” he said. Before he played the Golden Smog song “Pecan Pie,” he said, “I don’t think this song has any death in it. I never know until I start singing. There’s just so much death.” Like usual, Tweedy was self-deprecating with his stage banter. Later, when Tweedy made a slight misstep in “Summerteeth,” he commented: “I know the words and the chords. I just wanted to display a little infallibility so the weekend isn’t too perfect.”

Various musicians who’d played during the festival came out and played with Tweedy. When Cibo Matto joined with him, the opening chords on Tweedy’s acoustic guitar sounded like “All Along the Watchtower,” but it turned out to be a cover of Madonna’s “Into the Groove.” When Tweedy played “I’m the Man Who Loves You,” he dedicated it to his wife, Sue, adding: “I always dedicate this song to her, and if I ever don’t dedicate it to her, I want you to know on the record, it is dedicated to her.”

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Tweedy the band returned to the stage for the final segment of the concert, which included a faithful cover of John Lennon’s “God.” “You probably thought that was going to be the last song, didn’t you?” Tweedy said afterward. “It would have made sense … John Lennon mic drop.” But he had a few more songs to go. A big crowd of musicians joined him for “Give Back the Key to My Heart” and “California Stars,” with a grinning Bill Frisell taking a guitar solo on the latter song.

SET LIST — BAND: Hazel / Fake Fur Coat / Diamond Light Pt. 1 / Flowering / World Away / New Moon / Summer Noon / Honey Combed / Desert Bell / High As Hello / Wait For Love / Love Like a Wire (Diane Izzo cover) / Low Key / Nobody Dies Anymore / SOLO: Remember the Mountain Bed / Please Tell My Brother / Summerteeth / Pecan Pie / The Ruling Class / Chinese Apple (with Glenn Kotche and Ryley Walker) / Too Far Apart / Into the Groove (Madonna cover, with Cibo Matto and Nels Cline) / Grandpa Was a Carpenter (John Prine cover, with the Felice Brothers) / Harvest Moon (Neil Young cover, with Luluc) / Be Not So Fearful (Bill Fay cover, with John Stirratt and Pat Sansone) / I’m the Man Who Loves You / BAND: You Are Not Alone / Only the Lord Knows (Mavis Staples cover) / God (John Lennon cover, with Bill Frisell) / Losing End (Neil Young cover) / Give Back the Key to My Heart (Doug Sahm cover) / California Stars

Over the course of the three nights, Wilco and Tweedy repeated only a couple of songs, showing once again how rich their repertoire is. Wilco’s a rare example of a band with the depth, talent and creativity to justify and sustain an event like Solid Sound.

See my photos of Solid Sound Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3.

Solid Sound, Part 4

My recap of Solid Sound 2013, continued from blog posts 1, 2 and 3

The Solid Sound festival also featured rousing soul music by the Relatives; rootsy jamming by White Denim; harmonic pop by Lucius (who were most impressive when they guested with Wilco); Miracle Legion founder Mark Mulcahy doing solo music, with J. Mascis playing guitar in the back part of the stage; a nice set of solo singer-songwriter music by Sean Rowe; and singer-songwriter Sam Amidon playing quiet songs in the vein of Nick Drake as well as more traditional Appalachian folk, with Beth Orton (his wife) joining in for one song. Marc Ribot and Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo played a terrific set of their “Border Music,” and Brazil’s Os Mutantes playing songs from its new album Foot Metal Jack (which I’m not so keen on) but also some of its classic psychedelic tunes. And as mentioned in Part 2, the fest closed with a strong set by Medeski Martin & Wood, supplemented by various guests.

White Denim
White Denim
The Relatives
The Relatives
Mark Mulcahy
Mark Mulcahy
The Solid Sound fest at MASS MoCA
The Solid Sound fest at MASS MoCA
Sean Rowe
Sean Rowe
Lucius
Lucius
J. Mascis plays guitar during Mark Mulchay's set
J. Mascis plays guitar during Mark Mulchay’s set
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Os Mutantes
Marc Ribot and David Hidalgo
Marc Ribot and David Hidalgo
Marc Ribot
Marc Ribot
David Hidalgo
David Hidalgo
John Medeski
John Medeski
Billy Martin
Billy Martin
Chris Wood
Chris Wood
Chris Wood
Chris Wood
Medeski Martin & Wood
Medeski Martin & Wood
John Medeski
John Medeski

Watching all of the music, I missed most of the comedy cabaret hosted by Hodgman, though the portion I caught — featuring Hodgman and Jen Kirkman — was hilarious and eccentric.

In between the concerts, I stopped into MASS MoCA’s galleries and saw a few of the most striking and memorable artworks I’ve experienced in a while. The Chinese artist Xu Bing’s Phoenix, a pair of hundred-foot-long mythical birds constructed out of debris, is hanging from the ceiling in a room the size of an airport hangar. (And Xu Bing’s remarkable super-wide-screen animated film The Character of Characters was screening in another room.) Another gallery displayed a thousand or so miniature paintings that Tom Phillips created on the pages of an obscure Victorian-era novel, W.H. Mallock’s A Human Document. I could have spent many more hours examining these fascinating pictures. And then there was an entire building devoted to the paintings of minimalist Sol LeWitt. Now, I must confess here that I am unenthusiastic and generally bored by most minimalist art. When I see a big canvas covered in one color of paint, my typical response is, “Big deal.” So I wasn’t thrilled with the prospect of seeing all those LeWitt paintings. But there was something damn impressive about seeing all of them assembled in the three floors of this building. Taken as a whole, they became more like a weird piece of architecture.

Xu Bing's Phoenix at MASS MoCA
Xu Bing’s Phoenix at MASS MoCA
The Sol LeWitt exhibit at MASS MoCA
The Sol LeWitt exhibit at MASS MoCA
MASS MoCA's exhibit of art by Jason Middlebrook
MASS MoCA’s exhibit of art by Jason Middlebrook
A detail from inside artist Mark Dion's installation "The Octagon Room" at MASS MoCA
A detail from inside artist Mark Dion’s installation “The Octagon Room” at MASS MoCA
Tom Phillips' "A Humument," on display at MASS MoCA
Tom Phillips’ “A Humument,” on display at MASS MoCA

All in all, Solid Sound lived up to its name. It’s an inspiring model for how to run an arts festival — although it’ll be hard to emulate elsewhere, because how many other places are there like MASS MoCA?

Artist Mark Remec's piece "Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear (Circle Totem)" in the foreground, with the main Solid Sound stage in the background, following the end of the festival of Sunday evening
Artist Mark Remec’s piece “Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear (Circle Totem)” in the foreground, with the main Solid Sound stage in the background, following the end of the festival of Sunday evening
Artist Marko Remec's installation "Can't Hear You (Fat Totem)" — acrylic dome safety mirrors strung up on an old water tank — on the Solid Sound festival grounds at MASS MoCA
Artist Marko Remec’s installation “Can’t Hear You (Fat Totem)” — acrylic dome safety mirrors strung up on an old water tank — on the Solid Sound festival grounds at MASS MoCA
A courtyard at MASS MoCA
A courtyard at MASS MoCA

IMG_9810

Read more about Solid Sound and see more photos in Parts 1, 2 and 3

Solid Sound, Part 3

Read more about Solid Sound and see more photos in Parts 1, 2 and 4

My last two blog posts about Solid Sound were about what the members of Wilco were up to during this festival. But like any decent fest, this one wasn’t entirely about one band. In brief, the other highlights included a high-energy show on Saturday afternoon by The Dream Syndicate, who were cult favorites in the 1980s California indie-rock scene. This was their first North American gig in more than two decades, but as it felt like they’d never stopped playing.

The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate
The Dream Syndicate

Yo La Tengo played not one, but two shows during Solid Sound. Alas, I arrived too late on Friday night to get a set at the screening of the film The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller, featuring a live score performed by Yo La Tengo. On Saturday afternoon, the group played a typically excellent set of its songs, both old and new, with the most drastic shift in dynamics I heard all weekend. After blasting a couple of noisy songs to open their concert, Yo La Tengo took the volume way, way down for a couple of its hushed, whispery ballads, “The Point of It” and “Decora” — and it seemed like everyone in the crowd stopped making any sound so they could listen in. (At least, that’s what it was like by the stage, where I was standing.) By the end of the set, the band back at full volume.

Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
The MASS MoCA courtyard during Yo La Tengo's set
The MASS MoCA courtyard during Yo La Tengo’s set

Out of all the artists playing at Solid Sound, the one that seemed to represent younger, hyped bands was Foxygen. Just as they acted goofy during their recent in-store at Chicago’s Saki, Foxygen’s members seemed loopy at Solid Sound as they cavorted on the stage, playing their quirky, catchy songs. Perhaps they cavorted a bit too much. I heard most of Foxygen’s set, but I was away from the stage when lead singer Sam France reportedly tried to climb the scaffolding and got pulled down by security. Later in the day, I noticed three security guards surrounding Foxygen’s tambourine player, who looked intoxicated, and escorting him away from a tree. During Wilco’s show that night, Jeff Tweedy told the audience that the members of Foxygen had been “kicked out” of the festival. “They’re awesome. A little too awesome, I think,” he said. Later, he apologized, saying he hadn’t meant to disparage the band. But he dedicated the song “Passenger Side,” a song about drunk driving, to Foxygen. And then Tweedy brought up Foxygen one more time, suggesting that they might want to try drinking water onstage. The Reverse Direction blog has more about the Foxygen story. Whatever happened, I was charmed by what I saw of Foxygen’s set.

Foxygen
Foxygen
Foxygen
Foxygen
Foxygen
Foxygen

Although Low got some flack for playing one long droning song at the recent Rock the Garden festival in Minneapolis, the band played a standard set of its songs at Solid Sound on Saturday. And with Low, standard means beautiful.

Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low

Neko Case is another artist who nearly always delivers a good to great performance, and her show on Saturday night included a few songs from her forthcoming album The Worse Things Get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You, which comes out Sept. 3 on Anti. On first impression, the new songs sounded like a strong continuation of the singular style of music Case has been shaping over her last few records. For me, the highlight of the set was a heart-stopping performance of her 2002 song “I Wish I Was the Moon,” with Case’s voice plaintively calling out across the park in the opening verse. “We’re kind of a weird band for a festival because all of songs are bummers,” Case remarked at one point. Her stalwart harmony singer, Kelly Hogan, pointed out: “Low played earlier.” At the end of her set, Case said, “Every single song in our set is dedicated to that girl playing drums on her dad’s head.”

Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case and Kelly Hogan
Neko Case and Kelly Hogan
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Neko Case
Jon Rauhouse plays during Neko Case's set
Jon Rauhouse plays during Neko Case’s set
Neko Case
Neko Case

Read more about Solid Sound and see more photos in Parts 1, 2 and 4

Solid Sound, Part 2

Read more about Solid Sound and see more photos in Parts 1, 3 and 4

Given the fact that Solid Sound was a festival organized by Wilco, it’s not surprising that it also featured side projects by the band’s various members on Sunday (June 23). The most impressive of these may have been Wilco member Nels Cline’s eloquent, virtuosic guitar duets with Julian Lage. Cline later showed up as one of the guests during the festival-closing set on Sunday night by the jazz trio Medeski Martin & Wood, and he ended up playing for about half of their set, bending and twisting the notes on his guitar in a frenetic style reminiscent of John McLaughlin’s legendary work with the Mahavishnu Orchestra. (Tweedy, Hidalgo and Ribot also sat in on that set at various points.)

Nels Cline and Billy Martin
Nels Cline and Billy Martin during the set by Medeski Martin & Wood

Mikael Jorgensen — the keyboardist and electronics whiz who generally sits at the back of the stage during Wilco shows, making himself the least showy member of the band — had a couple of chances at Solid Sound to show off what he does. On Saturday, he generated live electronic analog synth music in a dark museum room, accompanied by longtime Wilco techs Nathaniel Murphy, Travis Thatcher and Josh Goldsmith. I dipped into the performance for a short sample, and it felt like I’d stepped out of the summer festival and into a … well, not a rave, exactly, since no one was dancing. A laboratory?

Mikael Jorgensen in the "Oscillator Fumes" room
Mikael Jorgensen in the “Oscillator Fumes” room

And then, the following afternoon, Jorgensen took his pulsing electronic music out into the broad daylight, playing a set with Greg O’Keeffe and Oliver Chapoy. I’m not sure if Wilco’s more traditional-music-loving fans knew what to make of it, but the droning noise settled over the museum courtyard like an invasion of cicadas — but with a danceable rhythm.

Mikael Jorgensen, Greg O'Keeffe and Oliver Chapoy
Mikael Jorgensen, Greg O’Keeffe and Oliver Chapoy
Mikael Jorgensen
Mikael Jorgensen
Oliver Chapoy
Oliver Chapoy
Greg O'Keeffe
Greg O’Keeffe

Another member of Wilco with avant-garde tendencies outside of the band, drummer Glenn Kotche, played as part of the duo On Fillmore, which also includes bassist Darin Gray. But it wasn’t a straightforward concert of their music. Rather, they provided accompaniment for an entertaining live version of the public radio show “Radio Lab,” which featured Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich reading from scripts and playing short clips from interviews as Kotche and Gray made sounds to evoke the story of the dinosaurs’ extinction.

The crowd gathered in a MASS MoCA courtyard for a live performance of "Radio Lab"
The crowd gathered in a MASS MoCA courtyard for a live performance of “Radio Lab”
Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich of "Radio Lab," with Darin Gray of On Fillmore
Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich of “Radio Lab,” with Darin Gray of On Fillmore
Glenn Kotche plays with On Fillmore
Glenn Kotche plays with On Fillmore
Glenn Kotche plays with On Fillmore
Glenn Kotche plays with On Fillmore
Darin Gray makes dinosaur noises with On Fillmore
Darin Gray makes dinosaur noises with On Fillmore
The key mammal that survived the meteor explosion that killed off the dinosaurs — the shrewdinger — appears during "Radio Lab," with Jad Abumrad, right.
The key mammal that survived the meteor explosion that killed off the dinosaurs — the shrewdinger — appears during “Radio Lab,” with Jad Abumrad, right.

While some members of Wilco contribute elements of jazz, electronic and avant-garde music to the mix, John Stirratt and Pat Sansone bring a power pop, classic rock and soft rock sensibility, and that was on full display when they performed as the Autumn Defense. After playing pretty pop songs from their own albums, they closed with a perfect cover of Bob Welch’s 1977 radio hit “Sentimental Lady.”

The Autumn Defense
The Autumn Defense
Pat Sansone plays with the Autumn Defense
Pat Sansone plays with the Autumn Defense
John Stirratt plays with the Autumn Defense
John Stirratt plays with the Autumn Defense

Meanwhile, the Blisters — a band featuring Jeff Tweedy’s son, Spencer, on drums — also played at Solid Sound. The youngsters got plenty of adults dancing as they rocked out near the end of their noontime Sunday set.

The Blisters
The Blisters
The Blisters
The Blisters
The Blisters
The Blisters

Read more about Solid Sound and see more photos in Parts 1, 3 and 4

Big Ears Festival

Knoxville, Tennessee, was one weird place this past weekend. I can only assume this charming Southern city isn’t so avant-garde most of the time, but for three days, it hosted a new celebration of experimental music called the Big Ears Festival. I made the drive from Chicago because I was so intrigued by the diverse lineup. Where else could you see Philip Glass playing piano in the afternoon, with Dan Deacon sitting in the second row – and then see Deacon doing his Baltimore Round Robin dance party at the end of the night?

As far as music fests go, this one was pretty small-scale, with just a few venues and fairly small audience, but that coziness helped to make it special. Audiences actually listened to the music in nearly complete silence, even during the shows that took place in bars. And the festival featured several one-time collaborations between the artists who had traveled to Knoxville for the festival. That’s the sort of thing I’d love to see happen more often at other fests.

One of the highlights was the Saturday night concert at the Bijou Theatre by Antony and the Johnsons, with string players and rock band backing up this remarkable singer with arrangements that ranged from delicate chamber music to swinging, soulful pop. Antony’s idiosyncratic sense of humor came through in his stage banter – as well as one remarkable pause, with Antony sitting silently at the piano bench while everyone else waited and waited and waited for him to say something or play something. After some nervous tittering in the crowd, Antony finally launched into his song, “Twilight.” It was one of the most oddly dramatic moments I’ve seen in a concert. At another point, Antony remarked about Big Ears: “I wish we had something like this in New York. We don’t. It’s nice to have something like this in – ” He paused, as if hesitating to use the phrase he had in mind for Knoxville, then blurted it out ” – a chicken village.”

Ned Rothenburg made a similar remark during his set at the Square Room: “It’s amazing to be at a festival celebrating this kind of music in the middle of the United States.” But what exactly is “this kind of music”? Big Ears was not really about any one musical genre. It was like more like the Island of Misfit Musicians – stuff that just doesn’t fit in anywhere else.

Several of the acts play music that either drones or tends to stay in place, building on single chords or even single notes. Or just on the textures of sound. The acts in this category include Fennesz (aka Christian Fennesz), who played solo and then sat in with David Daniell and Tony Buck of the Necks for an improvisation. Fennesz also teamed up with Mark Linkous and Scott Minor of Sparklehorse for the festival finale on Sunday, which surrounded Linkous’ singing with walls of sound.

Daniell was all over the festival, too, also playing a solo set and a show with his band San Agustin, as well as a jam session at the closing-night party. Each time, he coaxed some amazing tones out of his guitar – amorphous chords and notes rather than typical guitar riffs and solos – that built up from placid beauty to fierce intensity.

There was also an element of jazz in the festival – or maybe it would be more accurate to say it was free-form improvisation on instruments typically associated with jazz. Rothenburg played clarinets and saxophones with a real sense of physicality, as if he were wrestling with the instruments to force them to make noises they’re not supposed to make. He also performed a set in collaboration with the Necks, who played piano, bass and drums with a similar sense of uninhibited musical exploration. Another mostly jazz artist at Big Ears was Jon Hassell, but even his music felt different from most jazz, with a sense of space and air in the intervals between Hassell’s trumpet and the notes of his backup players.

Pauline Oliveros, a pioneer in experimental music, showed how she has moved on from analog tape delay to laptop. She sent almost random notes from her accordion through the computer to eight channels of sound all around a gallery at the Knoxville Museum of Art. As they twisted into new shapes, the notes drifted around the museum.

A few of the performers at Big Ears played more traditional word-and-melody songs – the aforementioned Antony, as well as Larkin Grimm and Michael Gira. Even though their music came in a more conventional form, it fit in with the festival. All of these performers seemed like artists who lay their intentions bare whenever they do their songs in front of a microphone.

Dan Deacon and his collaborators in the Baltimore Round Robin basically put on a party by taking turns at spinning music, performing songs and goading the audience into dance moves. The participants included Matmos, who also played a set before Deacon, bridging the gap between the more experimental sonic texture crowd and the song crowd.

Philip Glass played several etudes for solo piano, his fingers almost effortlessly rolling into those patterns that are so familiar from his recordings. The slight imperfections in his playing were actually what made it so perfect. The theories behind Glass’ minimalism can be easily programmed into a synthesizer or MIDI program, but creating those patterns the old-fashioned way, one note at a time on a piano, and making them breathe with life, is another thing altogether. Wendy Sutter played the Glass composition “Songs and Poems for Cello” solo, and she also joined together with Glass on “The Orchard.” I was delighted to hear Glass play “Closing” from the album | instock🔥 |. special reduced price. follow site ,Buy Cheap Pills with Discount.. Check More » Buy follow link - We guarantee the lowest prices and Fast WorlWideDelivery! Get Brand Products Online. | Best Price🔥 |. coupons 75% off Where Can I Buy Clomid Online Uk ,We offer products that help you solve your health problems.. Check More » Voltaren E Alcolici Online Online : Fast & Secured Order Processing. Free pills as a gift for every customer! Order Zoloft at the Best Price. Buy Brand and Generic Zoloft. Zanaflex Prescription Uk. TheRxGood: Friendly customer support, 24h online support. #1 Top OnlineShop. Order Tabs Online Without Prescription. Without Script Addiction is a long-term problem, virtually impossible. along with other out professional treatment and help. Even employers find it Buy click here it arduous to admit that there seem to be employees who seem to be addicted or able to recover. | Best Price🔥 |. We collect what you are looking for here. Buy Kamagra Oral Jelly Online Uk online ,Are You Searching Best pill?. Check More » | Up to 20% Off🔥 |. It solves the problem for you quickly. ☀☀☀ Clomid Online In Uk online ☀☀☀,special reduced price.. Buy Now » | Up to 30% Off🔥 |. The offer is limited. Cialis Name Brand Online,Low Cost. Pill Shop, Cheap Prices. Free samples for all orders.. Buy Now » Buy Claritin In Uk Glassworks, which was my original introduction to his music, during the encore.

In a separate category all their own, Negativland performed “It’s All in Your Head,” which is essentially a two-hour radio show – or audio collage. Or performance-art piece. The theme was God’s nonexistence, and Negativland plucked countless clips from radio and TV interviews, commercials, songs and movies to illustrate their theme, putting it all together in front of the audience with tapes, CDs, microphones and various electronic noise-making devices.

Big Ears was the sort of musical event that makes you wonder what music is, exactly. I’m sure some people wandering in off the street into some of these shows would have been baffled by some of the noises being made. Even if you didn’t appreciate or understand every single sound, it was interesting from beginning to end.

NOTES ON PHOTOGRAPHY: Oh, the travails of the concert photographer. A few minutes into the first set I was shooting Friday night (Fennesz), my Canon EOS 40D stopped working altogether. “Error 99.” That’s basically a message telling you that the camera won’t take any pictures and needs to go in for repairs. Thankfully, my friend Gavin Miller had a new camera, which he loaned me. This was one of the new point-and-shoots from Canon, the PowerShot SX110 IS. This camera worked pretty well whenever the lighting was halfway bright, but a lot of the Big Ears shows were dimly lit – and would have been challenging even with the 40D. So I did not end up with any Antony or Matmos photos at all that I care to share. Those shows were just too dark for photography. I did the best I could at other shows during the fest, and now I’m going to see about getting that 40D fixed.

Photos from the Big Ears Festival.

UPDATE (2/11/09): You can also see some of my photos from the Big Ears festival at Pitchfork, along with Grayson Currin’s review. See http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/article/news/149063-report-big-ears-festival-knoxville-tn-02-06-02-08-09