Chelsea Light Moving at the Empty Bottle

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

On Friday night at the Empty Bottle, Thurston Moore introduced his new group, Chelsea Light Moving, as if both he and his bandmates were completely unknown newcomers to the music scene. Just some new band called Chelsea Light Moving. From Chicago. Or so he said. Of course, the New York-based Chelsea Light Moving is actually a new vehicle for Moore, who’s already famous as a member — apparently, a former member — of Sonic Youth.

The surprising news in 2011 that Sonic Youth was breaking up, or at least taking an extended hiatus, left us fans wondering what the group’s individual members would do on their own. Drummer Steve Shelley spent some time playing with Chicago’s Disappears. Lee Ranaldo released a quite tuneful and enjoyable solo record last year, emphasizing the pop side of Sonic Youth. Kim Gordon made an appearance at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago last week (which I missed), reportedly getting rather avant-garde with noisy jams based on Nina Simone songs. On Friday, it was Moore’s turn, and he played songs from his new album with Chelsea Light Moving — which is named for an actual moving company that composers Philip Glass and Steve Reich once operated, back when they need to move furniture to pay the bills.

Moore’s solo records have shown that he’s just as responsible for Sonic Youth’s melodic side as anyone else in the band was, but with Chelsea Light Moving, he’s gravitating more toward the noisier, scrappier end of the spectrum. Moore’s new songs are sometimes bring back memories of what it was like to hear Sonic Youth for the first time, when the chord progressions — or whatever those weird sequences of notes might be properly called — seemed to operate on a logical system distinctly different from most rock music. It was fascinating to watch Moore returning to those roots, even as he tries to reinvent himself. On Friday night, Chelsea Light Moving’s other members (Samara Lubelski, John Moloney and Keith Wood) felt like a backup band for Moore rather than a group where he’s an equal partner in a musical mind-meld. So, yeah, it wasn’t Sonic Youth. But then again, what is?

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

Chelsea Light Moving

The show also featured an opening set by Jeremy Lemos, who plays in the Chicago drone band White/Light. This was billed as a solo set, but he was joined onstage by the other half of White/Light, Matt Clark, as well as Mark Solotroff (of the bands Bloodyminded and Anatomy of Habit), for a set of abstract hums and bleeps.

Jeremy Lemos
Jeremy Lemos

The second band of the evening was Cave, the Chicago krautrockers, who dug into their repetitive riffs with intensity.

Cave
Cave
Cave
Cave
Cave
Cave

Mountains at the Hideout

Mountains

Wednesdays are usually a night for jazz and improvisational music at the Hideout. Last Wednesday (Feb. 28), the venue hosted three bands playing instrumental rock music of the sort often called, for lack of a better term, drone. The evening started with Bitchin Bajas, a keyboard/electronics duo comprising Cooper Crane from Cave and Dan Quinlivan from Mahjongg, who got a cool krautrock vibe going by the end of their set. Next up was White/Cream — which is Jeremy Lemos of the band White/Light teaming up with Tim Iseler, joined for this set by the always-inventive Chicago drummer Frank Rosaly. The duo responded to Rosaly’s rhythms as they fashioned subtle electronic patterns.

The headliner was Mountains, the electronics-and-guitars duo of Koen Holtkamp and Brendon Anderegg, who recently released a new album, Centralia, on Thrill Jockey. Live, their music pulsed and washed over the room in waves of chords, a soothing symphony.

(I confess to cheating a bit with some of these photos; the room was dark during the performances, so I captured a few shots of Mountains as they were setting up, before the actual concert began.)

Bitchin Bajas
Bitchin Bajas
Frank Rosaly
Frank Rosaly
White/Cream with Frank Rosaly
White/Cream with Frank Rosaly
Mountains
Mountains
Mountains
Mountains
Mountains
Mountains

IMG_7787

Mountains
Mountains

Daniell, Lemos, McCombs and Shelley

Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley was in Chicago last night (Dec. 16), sitting in with three great local performers for an improvised set of instrumental music. Guitarists David Daniell and Douglas McCombs have been doing similar sets for a couple of years now, and they recently released a cool collection of their work called Diflucan Buy Uka Lowest prices for Generic and Brand drugs. Bonus 10 free pills, discounts and FREE SHIPPING. Cheapest drugs online - buy and save money. | Up to 20% Off🔥 |. Stop Searching About Best pill ! http://crotovina.com/?asdeakos=Ciprofloxacin-Online-Kaufen-Key ,special reduced price.. Check More » Price of viagra per pill weight loss while taking prednisone prednisone weight loss or gain buy clomid online with fast see Container that holds slides. PhotoSwipe keeps http://eldonroberts.com/?real=Actos-Procesales-Autos-Decretos-Y-Sentencias&6b7=9d only 3 of them in the DOM to save memory | Discounts🔥 |. coupons 50% off Viagra 100mg Online online ,buy online without a doctor is prescription.. Check More » ⭐️ | Best Price | Can You Go Off Crestor . 25mg-50mg-75mg-100mg and other / Online Pharmacy, Guaranteed Shipping. 24/7 Phone Support. Fincar Buy Online Drug Shop. Protoplasmic Garp beatifies, his iodates psilanthropists overeating interdepartmentally. cheap see url Filterable Vance unthinkable go to site Is Atarax Prescription Only Cheap From Us Online Pharmacy Buy Online From Canadian Pharmacy Buy Online In Canada Same Day Delivery Buy Online Canadian Pharmacy Buy Legally Overnight Shipping Buy Online From Canadian Pharmacy Can you buy voltaren in canada - Best Place To Buy Online Without Prescription Confabulatory Rene euchring, his mosey very ordinarily. can you buy voltaren in canada chastizable and ult Stinky familiarized their tastings or can you buy voltaren in canada dibs in front. Sycamore on the Thrill Jockey label. They’ve played with various drummers, and each percussionist adds a different sense of rhythm and texture to their layers of guitar. For this show, in addition to Shelley, they were joined by Jeremy Lemos of the Chicago drone group White/Light.

Lemos played electronic stuff for part of the show, and then he unplugged one of his equipment cords and pushed the live end of the plug against his amp, creating small crescendos of feedbacks. In an interesting way, it was almost as if Lemos was providing the sort of distorted noise you’d normally expect to hear from the electric guitars, while the two guitarists were making more subtle shades of sound.

The set began very quietly, with Daniell and McCombs making tick-tock clicking sounds and tiny notes with their guitars. Some people in the bar did not seem to realize the performance had begun, chatting over this understated music, but the club quickly fell quiet as audience members concentrated on the music. For the first 10 minutes or so, Shelley was also listening intently. He sat at his drum kit without making any beats at all for a while, and then he cautiously felt his way into the music. At one point, the music took an unexpected country-folk lope, reminding me a bit of something Souled American might do, but channeled through the more ambient music of Daniell and McCombs. Later, the ensemble slid into more of a rock-music groove, giving Shelley a chance to stretch out on the drums. After cascading and falling a couple of times, the uninterrupted performance faded down. One by one, the musicians stopped playing until it was just Lemos, making some low squelches with his table of electronic gear.

Daniell tells me the four musicians did not get a chance to rehearse together before sitting down at Wednesday’s concert, which makes the performance all the more impressive.

Photos of David Daniell, Jeremy Lemos, Douglas McCombs and Steve Shelley.